Bereavement Poetry

Our Funeral Poems site lists over 300 poems in alphabetical order and in categories such as for dad, for mum, for grandad, for grandma, for a wife, for a husband, etc. We currently list our poetry under more than thirty different categories. You will find the categories listed from the top index, and under the categories list you will find each poem listed in order of its first line or title.

As well as more generic, family based categories, we also have more specialized categories of poetry suitable for Alzheimer's sufferers, suicide victims, cancer sufferers, etc. so there is bound to be something suitable on the site.

We have made it easy for you to find the best poems for funerals, and you can search for poems by using the search box, or by checking the poetry categories, or by checking the alphabetical list of first lines.

We are always mindful that visitors to the funeral poems website are often bereaved, and our hope is that you will find some words of poetry that will speak to your heart and meet your need.

If you are visiting the site because you are preparing to conduct a funeral service, or are otherwise engaged in helping or comforting the bereaved, and we hope too that you will find verses that are suitable for your needs or that will help you to prepare or give a eulogy.

If you use one of the poems on a printed order of service please consider also printing this website address to show where you got it from. You could also support the site by clicking on the social networking 'Like' or 'Google +' links, or otherwise provide a link to this site from your own site or from your social networking page.

If you are a poet, please consider adding a poem to the site. The best type of funeral poems are those that will be relevant to, and touch the hearts of, the most people. For example, if you write about a mother who has four sons, it would only touch the hearts of someone who had that many sons. However, if you write about a mother who will be missed by her children, the poem will be relevant to anyone whose mother has died. The best poetry, the ones that get the most feedback and comments, appear to be poems that appeal to the most people.

Eulogy Story : She Is Gone

“I am standing upon the seashore.
A ship at my side spreads her white
sails to the morning breeze and starts
for the blue ocean.

She is an object of beauty and strength.
I stand and watch her until at length
she hangs like a speck of white cloud
just where the sea and sky come
to mingle with each other.

Then, someone at my side says;
"There, she is gone!"

"Gone where?"
Gone from my sight. That is all.
She is just as large in mast and hull
and spar as she was when she left my side
and she is just as able to bear her
load of living freight to her destined port.
Her diminished size is in me, not in her.

And just at the moment when someone
at my side says, "There, she is gone!"
There are other eyes watching her coming,
and other voices ready to take up the glad
shout;
"Here she comes!"

And that is dying.”

Henry Van Dyke (1852-1933)

Story Dragonfly

Once, in a little pond, in the muddy water under the lily pads, there lived a little water beetle in a community of water beetles. They lived a simple and comfortable life in the pond with few disturbances and interruptions. Once in a while, sadness would come to the community when one of their fellow beetles would climb the stem of a lily pad and would never be seen again. They knew when this happened; their friend was dead, gone forever.

Then, one day, one little water beetle felt an irresistible urge to climb up that stem. However, he was determined that he would not leave forever. He would come back and tell his friends what he had found at the top. When he reached the top and climbed out of the water onto the surface of the lily pad, he was so tired, and the sun felt so warm, that he decided he must take a nap. As he slept, his body changed and when he woke up, he had turned into a beautiful blue-tailed dragonfly with broad wings and a slender body designed for flying.

So, fly he did! And, as he soared he saw the beauty of a whole new world and a far superior way of life to what he had never known existed. Then he remembered his beetle friends and how they were thinking by now he was dead. He wanted to go back to tell them, and explain to them that he was now more alive than he had ever been before. His life had been fulfilled rather than ended. But, his new body would not go down into the water. He could not get back to tell his friends the good news. Then he understood that their time would come, when they, too, would know what he now knew. So, he raised his wings and flew off into his joyous new life!

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